THE NUTMEG POINT DISTRICT MAIL

the Avram Davidson electronic newsletter

Vol. II No. 6
31 March 1998
ISSN 1089-764X

Henry Wessells, Editor.
Cooper Wessells, Honorary Secretary.

Published bimonthly.
Contents copyright 1998 The Nutmeg Point District Mail and assigned to individual contributors. All rights reserved.

TEMPORARY CULTURE
P.O. Box 43072
Upper Montclair, NJ 07043-0072

Electronym: wessells@aol.com

Use the electronic address for requests to be added to or dropped from the mailing list.

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THE INVESTIGATIONS OF AVRAM DAVIDSON

St. Martin's Press will publish The Investigations of Avram Davidson, a collection of mystery stories by Avram Davidson, edited by Grania Davis and Richard A. Lupoff, with an introduction by Richard A. Lupoff and story notes by Grania Davis and "additional lolligags by Michael Kurland." This is particularly welcome news as the book (apparently scheduled for early 1999 release) will gather material that has not been as widely published as Avram's science fiction and fantasy stories. Further details of The Investigations of Avram Davidson (including a table of contents) will be published in the District Mail as they become known.

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THE GOLDEN NUTMEG AWARD

The winners of the 1998 Golden Nutmeg Award are Jan Bondeson's A Cabinet of Medical Curiosities (nonfiction) and Thomas Pynchon's Mason & Dixon (fiction). The Golden Nutmeg Award is presented annually by The Nutmeg Point District Mail to an outstanding work of fiction or nonfiction published in the preceding year that combines good writing, eclectic scholarship, and wit. Mason & Dixon (Henry Holt & Co.) is an omniumgatherum of science, bizarreries, eccentrics of various ethnicities, and world travel. Set in the late 18th century, the book follows the careers of surveyors Jeremiah Dixon and Charles Mason; while the narrative is easily as long as an 18th century picaresque novel such as Smollett's The Adventures of Peregrine Pickle, and runs through a suitably weird range of subjects and evokes an impressive succession of voices, Pynchon's novel is decidedly post-modern in its approach (and even the physical composition of the printed page).

A Cabinet of Medical Curiosities (Cornell University Press) is a gripping account of out-of-date medical theories and the origins of modern scientific medicine. A brief review follows this article.
The winner of the 1997 Golden Nutmeg Award was Robert W. Carrubba's translation of Exotic Pleasures, Fascicle III, Curious Scientific and Medical Observations by Englebert Kaempfer (Southern Illinois University Press, 1996). Nominations for the 1999 award (covering books published in 1998) should be sent by publishers or authors to the editor at the address above, with a copy of the book.

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A Cabinet of Medical Curiosities by Jan Bondeson

[xii] + 250p., with illustrations and bibliography.

Cornell University Press. Sag